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Addictions

January 1, 2009 Out of the Shadows Forever: Annual Report 2008-2009

The Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC) was created by the federal government in its budget of March 2007. The goal of the MHCC is to help bring into being an integrated mental health system that places people living with mental illness at its centre. To this end, the Commission encourages cooperation and collaboration among governments, mental health service providers, employers, the scientific and research communities, as well as Canadians living with mental illness, their families and caregivers. In this, the MHCC’s inaugural Annual Report, we are eager to share with Canadians the progress that has been made towards accomplishing our mandate.

May 3, 2006 Out of the Shadows at Last: Transforming Mental Health, Mental Illness and Addiction Services in Canada

Over the past year, the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology has received more than two thousand submissions from all across Canada on the subject of mental health, mental illness and addiction. Hundreds of Canadians shared heartbreaking stories that revealed to the Committee the true state of Canada’s mental health, mental illness and addiction “system.” The members of the Committee have come to recognize the reality that profound change is essential if persons living with mental illness are to receive the help they need and to which they are entitled. We trust that readers of this report will reach the same conclusion.

May 1, 2006 Out of the Shadows at Last: Transforming Mental Health, Mental Illness and Addiction Services in Canada (Part II)

Over the past year, the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology has received more than two thousand submissions from all across Canada on the subject of mental health, mental illness and addiction. Hundreds of Canadians shared heartbreaking stories that revealed to the Committee the true state of Canada’s mental health, mental illness and addiction “system.” The members of the Committee have come to recognize the reality that profound change is essential if persons living with mental illness are to receive the help they need and to which they are entitled. We trust that readers of this report will reach the same conclusion.

February 1, 2006 Framework for Action on Mental Illness and Mental Health

Canada is the only advanced industrial country that does not have a national strategy or plan on mental health. As a result, people in Canada suffer unnecessary disability and mortality from mental illness, addictions, and poor mental health, and system costs continue to rise. One in five people in Canada experience mental illness and are dependent on support from their families, communities, the economy, and a stretched social service system. This paper explains why a national mental health strategy is urgently needed.

September 3, 2005 Enhancing Productivity in Canada: Benefiting from the Contributions of All Canadians

In its pre-budget consultations for the fall of 2005, the Standing Committee of Finance indicated an interest in receiving input on how improvements to Canada’s productivity performance contributes to the economic growth of the nation. In this submission, the Canadian Mental Health Association challenged the committee to look outside of the traditional business/economic model of small, medium and large businesses to consider whether Canada is making the most out of the potential of all its citizens.

January 3, 2005 Hospital Mental Health Services in Canada (2002-2003)

The report focuses on individuals who were separated from hospital in 2002–2003 following an inpatient stay for a mental illness, covering the separation diagnosis categories of schizophrenia, mood disorders, substance related disorders, personality disorders, anxiety disorders, organic disorders, and other disorders. Given that an inpatient stay is a condition of inclusion, such separations generally represent the most severe among the population of individuals living with mental illness.

November 3, 2004 Balancing Individual Rights and Public Interest

In this 2004 submission to the House of Commons Committee on Justice, Human Rights, Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, the Canadian Mental Health Association outlines specific technical recommendations surrounding Bill C-10 to ensure that the legislation will provide for appropriate safeguards to ensure that the balance between public interest and individual rights is achieved.

November 1, 2004 Mental Health, Mental Illness and Addiction: Interim Report

For the purpose of this study, the Committee adopted a broad approach towards examining mental health, mental illness and addiction in terms of: the prevalence of mental disorders and their economic impact on various sectors of the Canadian society, including business, education and health care systems; relevant federal and provincial policies and programs; mental health strategies in other countries; mental health promotion, mental illness and suicide prevention; mental health related disease surveillance and research; access to and delivery of mental health services and addiction treatment; support to families and caregivers; and the potential for the development of a national action plan on mental health, mental illness and addiction in Canada.

May 3, 2004 Working Together Toward a Pan-Canadian Strategy on Mental Health/Mental Illness for the People of Canada

The Canadian Mental Health Association recommends five broad areas on which the Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology should move forward: developing and implementing a pan-Canadian national strategy on mental Illness/mental health; responding to the Premiers’ Council’s commitment to community mental health; ensuring that children and youth, aboriginals, women, and new immigrants are included in the national strategy; ensuring that suicide is addressed as part of the national strategy; and committing to increasing the capacity of the voluntary sector in the mental health community to participate in public policy development.

October 15, 2002 A Report on Mental Illnesses in Canada

A health problem of the scope and importance of mental illness requires a comprehensive surveillance system to monitor progress in achieving policy and program goals. A workshop held in September, 1999, co-sponsored by Health Canada and the Canadian Alliance on Mental Illness and Mental Health (CAMIMH), developed a comprehensive indicator framework for a Mental Illnesses and Mental Health Surveillance System. This report responds to the recommendations from the workshop to collate existing data in order to begin the process of creating a picture of mental illnesses in Canada.