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Research Reports

The documents on this page are reports on research conducted by CMHA and other external sources on issues concerning mental health and care.

February 3, 2008 Health Care in Canada 2008

Health Care in Canada 2008 (HCIC 2008) is the ninth in a series of annual reports on Canada’s health care system. Health Care in Canada 2008 continues the new format and focused content that was launched in HCIC 2007, providing a review of key analytic work undertaken at CIHI that highlights CIHI’s health care research priorities (access, quality of care, health human resources, funding/costs, etc.). Also included in this report is a review of seminal national and international health care research as it maps onto these health care priorities. HCIC 2008 is an important tool for health care researchers, persons involved in strategic decision-making in health care, the media and Canadians in general to identify current priorities in health care.

January 3, 2008 Reducing Gaps in Health: A Focus on Socio-Economic Status in Urban Canada

Canadians are among the world’s healthiest populations, but not all Canadians are equally healthy. Gaps (or differences) in health are particularly observable in urban Canada, where links between health and socio-economic status (SES) can be analyzed at small geographical levels. This report addresses multiple material and social dimensions of SES by using an index that incorporates education, income, employment, single-parent families, persons living alone and the proportion of persons separated, divorced or widowed.

January 1, 2008 Antipsychotic Use in Seniors: An Analysis Focusing on Drug Claims, 2001 to 2007

The purpose of this analysis by the Canadian Institute for Health Information is to look at trends in the use of antipsychotics in seniors (defined in this analysis as people 65 or older) between 2001–2002 and 2006–2007, using drug claims data from public drug programs in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. This analysis will look at trends in use by age and sex, and compare the use of typical and atypical agents. Additional analyses will focus on atypical antipsychotics, including use and average daily dose by chemical, use in community and long-term care settings, as well as use among seniors with and without claims for anti-dementia drugs.

January 1, 2008 Review of the Roots of Youth Violence

When Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty asked us to undertake this review in the aftermath of the fatal shooting of a high school student at school, he had the wisdom not to simply ask for short-term ideas about how to deploy yet more law enforcement resources to try to suppress this kind of violence. Instead, he asked us to spend a year seeking to find out where it is coming from — its roots — and what might be done to address them to make Ontario safer in the long term.

January 1, 2008 Improving the Health of Canadians: Mental Health, Delinquency and Criminal Activity

Mental health factors, such as one’s level of self-esteem or ability to handle stress, are linked to whether or not a young Canadian will display delinquent behaviour or become involved in criminal activity. According to a new study from the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI), youth aged 12 to 13 who reported hyperactivity and depression were more likely to report high levels of aggressive behaviour, as well as high levels of delinquent acts involving property. In contrast, new analyses show that youth aged 12 to 15 with high levels of self-esteem, good stress management and self-motivation are more likely to report never engaging in aggressive behaviour.

October 30, 2006 National Council of Welfare: Welfare Incomes 2005

Welfare Incomes 2005 estimates total welfare incomes for four types of households in each province and territory, for a total of 52 scenarios. The four household types we use are a single employable person, a single person with a disability, a lone-parent with a 2-year-old child, and a two-parent family with two children aged 10 and 15. The National Council of Welfare has published similar estimates since 1986.

May 3, 2006 Out of the Shadows at Last: Transforming Mental Health, Mental Illness and Addiction Services in Canada

Over the past year, the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology has received more than two thousand submissions from all across Canada on the subject of mental health, mental illness and addiction. Hundreds of Canadians shared heartbreaking stories that revealed to the Committee the true state of Canada’s mental health, mental illness and addiction “system.” The members of the Committee have come to recognize the reality that profound change is essential if persons living with mental illness are to receive the help they need and to which they are entitled. We trust that readers of this report will reach the same conclusion.

May 1, 2006 Health is Cool! 2006 Survey on Canadian Attitudes towards Physical and Mental Health at Work and Play

This booklet explores the realities of Canadians’ perceptions towards mental health issues and the impact of 24/7 technology. It also reveals how the pursuit of money and the shift in interpersonal relationships affect the well-being of people’s daily lives. The subject matter also delves into mental health issues in the workplace, offers some tools for stress management, and presents ideas toward achieving a happy medium between work and personal life.

May 1, 2006 Out of the Shadows at Last: Transforming Mental Health, Mental Illness and Addiction Services in Canada (Part II)

Over the past year, the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology has received more than two thousand submissions from all across Canada on the subject of mental health, mental illness and addiction. Hundreds of Canadians shared heartbreaking stories that revealed to the Committee the true state of Canada’s mental health, mental illness and addiction “system.” The members of the Committee have come to recognize the reality that profound change is essential if persons living with mental illness are to receive the help they need and to which they are entitled. We trust that readers of this report will reach the same conclusion.

January 3, 2005 Hospital Mental Health Services in Canada (2002-2003)

The report focuses on individuals who were separated from hospital in 2002–2003 following an inpatient stay for a mental illness, covering the separation diagnosis categories of schizophrenia, mood disorders, substance related disorders, personality disorders, anxiety disorders, organic disorders, and other disorders. Given that an inpatient stay is a condition of inclusion, such separations generally represent the most severe among the population of individuals living with mental illness.