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Find Help

Most of us go through life solving our day-to-day problems without needing help to cope with our feelings. But a severe illness, an accident or an emotional crisis can overwhelm us, at least temporarily, and suddenly we need help. In this section, you will find resources and tips on getting help when you need it most.
Are you in crisis?
If you or someone you know is in crisis and needs immediate assistance, go to the nearest hospital or call 9-1-1.
Do you need medical advice?
Contact your General Practitioner for a referral to a qualified mental health care professional.
Community support services
For mental health services in your community, contact your local Canadian Mental Health Association branch.

A Guide to College and University for Students with Psychiatric Disabilities

Your Education Your FutureAttending college or university opens up an exciting world of possibilities. It can also be pretty challenging. But if you’re living with a mental illness, you’ve faced challenges before. This resource is designed to make your transition to college or university just a little bit easier. It takes you through all the steps of going to school, providing information and tips for anyone living with a mental illness.

Download the full guide as a PDF or visit www.cmha.ca/youreducation/.

Getting Help

Some people worry about asking for help because there can be stigma around mental health problems. They may believe that asking for help means admitting that something is wrong. Some people worry about how others might see them. Asking for help means that you want to make changes or take steps towards your new health goals. We should celebrate the courage it takes to speak up and make changes. Getting help is part of recovery.

Hangin' in There: Strategies for Job Retention by Persons with a Psychiatric Disability

This booklet is written primarily for people with psychiatric disabilities and it reflects their personal view points on the subject of job retention.

Mental Health and High School Curriculum Guide

Mental Health and High School CurriculumSchool-aged youth are a vulnerable population. They are in a period their lives that is crucial in their mental health development. Canadian youth spend more time in school than anywhere else outside the home. Schools are often challenged to deal with youth mental health, but are seriously under equipped and inadequately supported to handle this responsibility.

The curriculum guide provides a complete set of educational tools to increase understanding of mental health and mental disorders among both students and teachers.

To purchase the guide, visit teenmentalhealth.org.

Mental Health Works

Mental Health Works helps organizations to manage their duty to accommodate employees experiencing mental disabilities such as depression or anxiety in the workplace. In many cases, employers are so afraid of saying or doing the wrong thing, that they say nothing. This can lead to decreased productivity, lower morale, and conflict in the work environment. We help employers respond immediately and appropriately when employees experience mental health problems and effectively manage performance and productivity issues. It is founded on the belief that focusing on solutions around mental health issues in the workplace will benefit employers and employees alike.

Mental Illness in the Workplace

For people experiencing a mental illness, a good work/life balance is critical. The relationship between stress and mental illness is complex, but certainly stress can exacerbate mental illness for some people. In fact, according to Statistics Canada, employees who considered most of their days to be quite a bit or extremely stressful were over 3 times more likely to suffer a major depressive episode, compared with those who reported low levels of general stress.

Steps to Employment: A Workbook for People Who Have Experienced Mental Health Problems

This workbook is meant to help individuals with mental health problems build self-confidence and create ideas on how to find a job. The exercises in this manual are designed to help identify strengths and expectations about work/life balance. These exercises are also beneficial for those in a support group and job skill building sessions.

The Students' Guide to Mental Health and High School

The Students’ Guide to Mental Health and High School explores some of the issues related to being a teen and experiencing mental health problems and mental illness.The information in this guide is for all teens struggling with mental health problems, whether or not you’ve got an actual diagnosis. The purpose of this guide is to give youth who are having mental health problems some tools to help them get through high school and go on to work or further studies at college or university.

Working Well: An Employer's Guide to Hiring and Retaining People with Mental Illnesses

This guide is designed for employers concerned about retaining employees with a mental illness, and those actively seeking to hire people with a psychiatric disability. It outlines principles and practical strategies useful to small businesses and corporations, the private sector as well as government services.